Category Archives: HOME

Cozy Up to Vintage Handwoven Textiles

Is there a better way to add bright beautiful color to a corner or a sofa or a bed then with a colorful handwoven textiles? From hand crocheted afghans to hand woven Saltillo blankets – it seems like their color and beautiful details add so much to any environment. Especially since no two pieces are exactly alike.

In the winter or a chilly night in any season, a pile of blankets is comforting. On one of those nights, when hibernating seems like part of the natural rhythm of life . . . grab an afghan or a blanket, pick up that book or maybe even, watch the final season of Downton Abbey.

A stack of vintage textiles - runners, rugs, afghan and Saltillo blankets.

A stack of vintage textiles – runners, rugs, afghan and Saltillo blankets.

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Selling Pieces of the Past: The World is Your Marketplace

Governor  James Rhodes brought the dream of the Appalachian Highway to life with a lot of political capital earned over the span of a long political career. Born and raised in Southern Ohio, his efforts on behalf of the people and the economy of Appalachian Ohio are still remembered. Jimmy, as the old timers call him, is a local hero.

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Appalachian Highway, Wikipedia.

 

Others traveling through the region might read the roadside sign dedicated to his memory. As one newspaper reported:

On its long, empty stretches, the James A. Rhodes Appalachian Highway gives drivers green vistas of southern Ohio’s rolling hills. This is not the green that planners had in mind.

The need for connecting roads was felt long before Governor Rhodes. H. R. Wylie, the owner of the pottery in Huntington, was very active in politics on the West Virginia side of the Ohio River. Mr. Wylie lobbied for support, invested a great deal of money to effect change and even entertained the idea of running for state office. Roads were essential for commerce – which as every school boy knows is good for the people.

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A Railroad Tunnel Built in the Late 19th Century, Moonville, Ohio.

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Rare Vintage Woven Wicker Picnic Basket

Rare Red-Man Vintage Picnic Basket

Rare Red-Man Vintage Picnic Basket

 

This picnic basket is supported with an oak frame and split oak base; double-wooden handle and brass tacks and hinges. The woven wicker top is supported by fiber board. Notice the diamond accent also woven in wicker. This basket is a real beauty.

Vintage Fashion: An Old Fashioned Wedding

Sometimes I “meet” people on Etsy who speak to me far beyond their email or convo in Etsy speak. In fact, I think that I have been so lucky to meet so many kind and generous people on Etsy. But one day, I discovered that a pair of gloves was going to be worn at a wedding. Imagine that . . . a wedding in Texas. A pair of sheer pink gloves that are much like the pair pictured in this advertisement.

Sheerio Gloves Ad

Sheerio Gloves Ad

 

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True Romance: The Perfect Picnic Spot

“Let’s have a picnic.”  Yes!  Gather the supplies and pack the food. The adventure really begins once we are all in the car. We must find the “perfect” picnic spot. At first, we pass places that are not shady enough, parks with too many people or for one reason or other they are “not quite right.” As time passes and the sun wanes, boredom sets in and hunger prevails, not-so-perfect picnic spots look so much better – even you might say, perfect.

My favorite book describing the hunt for a perfect picnic spot is “The Bears Picnic” by the Berenstain Brothers. Even though it has been a long long time since I have read it to a child, whenever I think about picnics, I think about the bears’ picnic. I enjoyed reading another take on this book at Write Run Repeat. The perfect spot,  of course, is very close – no need to travel at all  – a backyard picnic is a joyful idea.

http://writerunrepeat.com/tag/berenstain-bears/

Bears Picnic

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A New Look for a Vintage Filigree Vanity Tray: Mason Jars and Milk Glass

I often wonder about the new homes for the vintage treasures that we send. Taryn paired a 1950s mirrored filigree vanity tray with painted ball jars and then added a glass knob.  . . . what a great new look for a vintage tray.

Vintage Filigree Mirrored Tray with Vanity Jars. Ball Jars painted white - Voila! New use for Ball Jars.

Vintage Filigree Mirrored Tray with Vanity Jars. Ball Jars painted white – Voila! New use for Ball Jars.

Celebrate Our Storefront with this Guatemalan Tote Bag

Time to celebrate . . who doesn’t love to give? We’re giving this beautiful Guatemalan tote bag to one lucky person. We will select one name randomly on Saturday, August 22.  Just leave a comment on our Facebook Page – what do you like best about this bag?

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Russell Wright Chartreuse Salt and Pepper Shakers – For You

All that is needed to understand the beauty of  ergonomics is to hold the salt and pepper shakers designed by Russel Wright for Steubenville in your hands . . . to hold them is to love them. They fit the hand so perfectly.

And we would like to give you that opportunity. We are giving away this set of chartreuse Russel Wright Salt and Pepper Shakers.

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Ohio River Pottery: Shadows by John Gilkes for Taylor, Smith & Taylor

The ink was barely dry on his master’s thesis when John Gilkes accepted the position of Lead Designer for the Taylor, Smith Taylor Pottery. Gilkes, under the tutelage of Arthur E. Baggs, the renown potter and professor of ceramics at Ohio State University, researched production techniques for new dinnerware shapes. Innovation was paramount to the potteries that had enjoyed success along the banks of the Ohio River. Especially in light of the heightened competition from the Asian marketplaces and the new attraction of plastics to homemakers.

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Amesville, Ohio: A Place Called Home

I grew up in a large Metropolitan Area – Chicago Heights, Illinois. It was suburban; my big idea as a teenager was to move to the city. I loved the energy and anonymity of the city.

Once married, I lived in Kirksville Missouri, back then it was a very small town. I soon discovered the joys of living in a small town. No doubt because it was a college town, I had great friends and so many unforgettable moments. Soon enough, I found that I could not imagine living in the big city, especially with children in tow.

Living in a small town is easy. The drive to the post office, bank or small grocery store/gas station is about seven minutes or 2 1/2 miles. It is a a beautiful drive  . . . it looks a lot like the drawing The Ohio Company.  In Amesville, there are no traffic lights.  There is very little traffic. There are very few residents; around 150-200 lucky people live here..

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Restaurant Ware: Warwick China Company, Wheeling, West Virginia

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Warwick China Company enjoyed a long history – over sixty years producing decorative pieces, fine dinnerware and finally, vitrified china. According to their catalog ca. 1940s, they produced “Vitrified China for Hotels, Clubs, Restaurants, Institutions, Steamships, Railroads, and Hospitals.”  No doubt, their entry into china production for commercial accounts was one way in which the Warwick China Company hoped to keep the kilns firing and so many residents of Wheeling employed. After all, Wheeling was one of the great manufacturing centers in the nineteenth century. Sadly, this manufacturer closed in doors in 1951.

Warwick had produced some of the most beautiful china – highly decorated and complex pieces. They were one of the few American potteries to attempt the manufacture of flow blue. Their expertise was well known in the pottery world. Wheeling of course possessed all of the natural assets necessary to produce, market and ship wares. The chamber of commerce of Wheeling announced that Wheeling was at the crossroads for manufacturing and shipping. Most American pottery was manufactured in the Ohio Valley along the mighty Ohio River. And as a consequence, Wheeling certainly played an important part in the history of Ohio River Pottery.

Map from Chamber of Commerce Brochure

Map from Chamber of Commerce Brochure

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Ohio River Pottery: Russel Wright for Steubenville Pottery, American Modern

The dinnerware designed by Russel Wright is included in the rather broad [and vague] category, Mid Century Modern.  Russel Wright designed the new line of American Modern Dinnerware in the 1930s. His designs were, in part, a reaction to the formality of the late Victorian dinner table. Many courses served with service changes that required “help” in the kitchen. A way of living,  that was certainly at odds in the 1930s when many could no longer afford imported fancy serve ware or a household staff to serve. His stated intent was to bring design to everyone – American Modern would become the best selling dinnerware in American history.

His design took another turn; the post modernist turn. He looked to the form and function of each piece, first, and then applied glazes that reflected the natural world. You might even say, he used organic shapes and colors that soothed a generation in an era of unsettling news –  economic downturns, political unease and total war on a global scale. As much as his design fascinates, his later avocation to restore land that included abandoned quarries near the Hudson River inspires me. I plan to visit . .

The first piece of Russel Wright that I found was in a box in an abandoned trailer. Although I didn’t know who made the piece, I was captivated by the color and shape. I soon discovered the pitcher was manufactured by Iroquois China and designed by Russel Wright. The pitcher is definitive of Wright’s design – curves that do not end. There are no hard edges. Truly wonderful to hold and behold.  And the color  . . .  drawn from the forest at sunset.

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