Every Plate Tells a Story: Horn and Hardart

At the turn of the last century, the potteries along the Ohio River were working overtime to fulfill rapidly increasing orders – bricks for streets, clay products for drainage, durable toilet wares, and dinnerware. American potteries had developed new production methods and, importantly for consumers, the china produced was equal to the wares produced in England. There was a celebratory air in the potteries as described by editors in business journals.

Classic Americana: Heavy Old Diner Coffee Mug

Classic, curvy, heavy and durable coffee mug. The kind used in the local diner for years. From that less than glamorous beginning, mugs like these have become icons of the past. They were made to endure over time – in short, they don’t make them like this anymore.
– The lines were hand drawn – no two mugs are the same.
– Not poured into a mold, hand-fashioned on a wheel
– Vitrified by high temps, fired at 2200 degrees, the glaze fuses with the clay to form glass – resistant to stains, safe for the dishwasher.
– Because of the weight and thickness, this mug will keep your hot beverage warm for just a bit longer.

This beauty was produced by Sterling China Wellsville Ohio in the 1930s; the stamp is very early.

The classic white coffee mug was produced by Hall China in East Liverpool, Ohio, circa 1925

Both mugs weigh nearly 1.25 pounds

 

Available at http://etsy.me/2f9xlKg

Classic Restaurant Ware – The Green Crest Border

If there is one pattern that defines restaurant ware then perhaps, a green crest border would find a place in the top three patterns. But still, it is not easy to find in quantity these days. But sometimes, a tall stack of these old diner dishes appears in a dusty old basement or the back room of a restaurant. Like these. . . . stacks and stacks of plates.

Green Crest Restaurant Ware